Nuala Creed’s “Internet Archives” clay sculpture series celebrates the humans behind The Cloud Photo by Don Felton

Nuala Creed’s “Internet Archives” clay sculpture series celebrates the humans behind The Cloud
Photo by Don Felton

What’s in The Cloud?

Why does it matter?

Where is it taking us?

“From Clay to Cloud,” an interactive exhibit opening Saturday at Loyola Marymount University’s Laband Art Gallery, invites visitors to dive into the vast storerooms of the Internet Archive.

A repository of web content, movies, games and about three million books, the Internet Archive contains about more than 20 petabytes of digital information.

A petabyte is one million gigabytes. Your Kindle e-reader typically has a two-gig storage capacity.

Founded by digital librarian Brewster Kahle (who also created the web analytics company Alexa), the Internet Archive aims to be a 21st-century Library of Alexandria storing digital artifacts for future generations. But it continues to rely on human archivists to give meaning to its swaths of information.

The exhibit includes a collection of ancient clay cuneiforms to demonstrate how humans play a crucial role in documenting, archiving and giving meaning to the information that shapes our lives.

Also on display are Nuala Creed’s ceramic sculptures of those who maintain the Internet Archive. Creed and Kahle will be on hand to give talks about the exhibit at 2 p.m. Saturday.

Laband Art Gallery workers and volunteers will also be using a state-of-the-art scanner to digitally archive items from the William H. Hannon Library throughout the
exhibition’s run.

— Christina Campodonico

“From Clay to Cloud” opens from 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 23, and continues through March 20 at the Laband Art Gallery, 1 LMU Drive, Westchester. Free. Call (310) 338-2880 or visit cfa.lmu.edu/labandgallery/.

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