STUDENT MEMBERS from the CALPIRG Energy Service Corps visited schools like the Delphi Academy in Santa Monica on spring break to educate youngsters on the importance of sustainable energy use.

STUDENT MEMBERS from the CALPIRG Energy Service Corps visited schools like the Delphi Academy in Santa Monica on spring break to educate youngsters on the importance of sustainable energy use.

For some college students, spring break was not about letting loose at the beach or partying at an exotic locale, but rather passing on knowledge of sustainable energy use to younger students.
This spring break, 79 student members of CALPIRG Energy Service Corps from 15 universities, including UCLA and University of California-Irvine, visited schools such as the Delphi Academy in Santa Monica to educate over 7,500 K-12th grade students on the importance of conserving energy to protect the environment.
The college students as well as CALPIRG’s student AmeriCorps members and interns spent a month planning the trips. During the program, the students toured cities across the state to hold interactive lessons on simple steps K-12 youngsters can take to protect the environment by saving energy.
The youths were instructed on actions they can do to save energy at home, such as turning off lights when they leave the room and unplugging appliances that are not in use.
A trip kickoff event at the Delphi Academy in Santa Monica was attended by Mayor Pam O’Connor, who participated in classroom presentations alongside the university students.
“More than a third of the energy we use in the United States goes toward powering the buildings in which we live and work. Because much of this energy comes from dirty and dangerous sources like coal, oil, and natural gas, powering America’s buildings is responsible for 30 percent of our global warming pollution, which is fueling extreme weather events like droughts, wildfires, and super storms,” Environment California Federal Field Associate Sean Carroll told participants.
“Too much of this energy is wasted through poor insulation, leaky windows, inefficient lighting, heating or cooling systems, and poor construction techniques.”
Trip participants also learned how to do simple home energy upgrades by sealing cracks and replacing inefficient incandescent light bulbs.
“To reduce global warming emissions, there are many opportunities to cut back on wasted energy,” Carroll said.

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