THE DEPARTMENT OF BEACHES AND HARBORS has won an award for a restoration project on Venice Beach.

THE DEPARTMENT OF BEACHES AND HARBORS has won an award for a restoration project on Venice Beach.

Venice Beach has been named one of the winners of The American Shore and Beach Preservation Association’s 2013 “Best Restored Beach Award,” the association has announced.
The award was given for a recent sand restoration project spearheaded by the Los Angeles County Department of Beaches and Harbors.
“(The association) created the Best Restored Beach Award in 2001 as a way of highlighting the value of America’s restored beaches,” said Harry Simmons, mayor of Caswell Beach, N.C. and the organization’s president. “As Americans flock to our coastlines during the upcoming beach season, most don’t even realize they may be enjoying a restored beach.”
The 2011 sand restoration project recognized used 30,000 cubic yards of sand that was excavated and hauled from the wider beach north of the Venice breakwater to the narrowest section of the beach near the Los Angeles County Lifeguard Division Headquarters.
The $1 million restoration project, funded both by the county general fund and state vehicle license fees, was one of multiple efforts to widen the 2,000-foot-long stretch of beach that continually loses sand to both natural tidal activity and winter storms, said a Beaches and Harbors spokesperson. During severe storms in 2004-05, significant erosion occurred in the area, threatening lifeguard and other beach facilities, the spokesperson said.
Each winter, temporary sand berms are constructed to protect beach amenities from coastal flooding, but regular sand restoration is critical to offset beach erosion, according to Gary Jones, deputy director of the Department of Beaches and Harbors.
“Sand restoration is one of the key ways to protect not just the width of a beach but all of the facilities that help ensure safe public access to this popular destination,” Jones said. “We are proud that ASBPA has recognized our efforts to maintain Venice Beach.”
To enter the Best Restored Beach competition, coastal communities nominated their projects for consideration, and an independent panel of coastal managers and scientists selected the winners. Judging was based on three criteria: the economic and ecological benefits the beach brings to its community; the short- and long-term success of the restoration project; and the challenges each community overcame during the course of the project.

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